GIVE

Dr. Ariena H.C. Van Bruggen

Professor


updated bio pic for ariena van bruggen

Contact

Rm. # 2413 Fifield Hall, 2550 Hull Road
Gainesville, FL, 32611
(352) 273-4649
ahcvanbruggen@ufl.edu

Background
  • PhD in Plant Pathology (1985)
    with a Minor in Vegetable Crops
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
  • MSc in Plant Pathology (1976)
    Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherland

Employment

  • Professor of Plant Pathology and Epidemiologist (2009-present), University of Florida, USA
  • Professor and Chair of Biological Farming Systems (1999-2009), Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1996-1999), Univ. of California at Davis, CA
  • Associate Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1992-1996), UC Davis
  • Assistant Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1986-1992), UC Davis
  • Post-doctoral Associate in Environmental Biology (1985-1986), Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, NY
  • Research and Teaching Assistant in Plant Pathology (1980-1984), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • Associate Expert in Plant Pathology (1976-1980), Food and Agricultural Organization of the U.N., in Ethiopia

International Awards

  • Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (2012).
  • APS Ciba-Geigy award from the American Phytopathological Society (1993), for "significant contributions to the advancement of knowledge of plant diseases and their control"
  • Jakob Eriksson Gold Medal from the Jakob Eriksson Prize Fund Commission, Swedish Academy of Sciences (1993), in recognition of "your original and thorough work on the new disease, 'corky root' of lettuce, caused by a hitherto unknown pathogen, the bacterium Rhizomonas suberifaciens."

Recent and Current International Activities

2016 Teaching an international course on the epidemiology of bacterial plant diseases in Finland
2015-present Member of the Plant Health Panel of the European Food Safety Authority
2005-present Member of the Scientific Council of Agroinnova, Turino, Italy
2000-present Member of the Jakob Eriksson Prize Fund Commission of the International Society of Plant Pathology

Supervision of Finalized PhD Theses

19 as main advisor and 18 as co-advisor

Publications

About

Dr. Ariena H.C. van Bruggen came to the University of Florida in 2009 as a full professor in the Department of Plant Pathology and the Emerging Pathogens Institute. She has a 20% teaching and 80% research appointment. She has carried out research on the epidemiology and spread of emerging plant pathogens and on the relation between ecosystem health and the invasion by plant and human pathogens. She develops simulation and risk models for pathogen spread. At UF, she has coordinated an introductory plant pathology course (once), taught a colloquium series on the use of statistical analysis in plant pathology (once) and taught the graduate course in Plant Disease Epidemiology every other year.

Research

Epidemiology and Microbial Ecology

Prof. Van Bruggen carries out fundamental and applied research on ecosystem health in relation to the invasion by plant and human pathogens. A healthy ecosystem is characterized by a dynamically balanced and diverse community of organisms, stability and resilience after disturbances, minimal losses of nutrients and energy, and sporadic outbreaks of pests and diseases. We hypothesize that the extent of oligotrophy, in terms of easily available carbon sources and mineral nutrients, largely determines the health status of an ecosystem. This concept was developed based on research results on the survival and spread of enteric human pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica) from manure to soil, water and plants. A probabilistic risk model was developed for the contamination of a lettuce crop by manure, soil, and water contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. Internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhmurium in tomato leaves, stems and fruits by was shown to occur from contaminated water and aerosols. Simulation models were developed for the survival of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in manure, manure-amended soil and water. We are currently collaborating on a risk model for the transfer of Salmonella from soil and water to tomato fruits.

Besides research on ecosystem health and transmission routes of enteric pathogens, the integration of various temporal and spatial scales of ecological processes and the dispersal capacity of (re)emerging pathogens in agroecosystems have been recurrent themes in van Bruggen’s research projects. The dynamics of disease progress can be understood better when we take the response time into account for the different developmental stages of the pathogen in relation to the hourly dynamics of environmental conditions rather than average conditions. This was shown for the plant pathogens Bremia lactucae and Phytophthora infestans as well as for the human pathogens E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. This research has implications for the effects of climate change on pathogen growth. We are currently developing a simulation model for the potential effects of climate change on late blight development.

On the applied side, an audit-based certification system for the greenhouse ornamental industry, including a risk model for pathogen spread, has been developed. In addition, the epidemiology and spread of emerging plant pathogens like Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and Guignardia citricarpa associated with citrus huanglongbing and black spot, respectively, as well as Raffaelea lauricola causing laurel wilt, have been studied and simulation and risk models have been developed for the spread of these pathogens.

Teaching

Prof. Van Bruggen teaches a course on plant disease epidemiology in odd years, and is teaching the use of statistical methods in plant pathology in a colloquium series. She supervises and co-supervises several graduate students at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

PLP 6921(gatorlink creds required)

Contact

Rm. # 2413 Fifield Hall, 2550 Hull Road
Gainesville, FL, 32611
(352) 273-4649
ahcvanbruggen@ufl.edu

Background
  • PhD in Plant Pathology (1985)
    with a Minor in Vegetable Crops
    Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
  • MSc in Plant Pathology (1976)
    Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherland

Employment

  • Professor of Plant Pathology and Epidemiologist (2009-present), University of Florida, USA
  • Professor and Chair of Biological Farming Systems (1999-2009), Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1996-1999), Univ. of California at Davis, CA
  • Associate Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1992-1996), UC Davis
  • Assistant Professor in Plant Pathology, with emphasis on vegetable crops (1986-1992), UC Davis
  • Post-doctoral Associate in Environmental Biology (1985-1986), Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, NY
  • Research and Teaching Assistant in Plant Pathology (1980-1984), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • Associate Expert in Plant Pathology (1976-1980), Food and Agricultural Organizationof the U.N., in Ethiopia

International Awards

  • Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (2012).
  • APS Ciba-Geigy award from the American Phytopathological Society (1993), for "significant contributions to the advancement of knowledge of plant diseases and their control"
  • Jakob Eriksson Gold Medal from the Jakob Eriksson Prize Fund Commission, Swedish Academy of Sciences (1993), in recognition of "your original and thorough work on the new disease, 'corky root' of lettuce, caused by a hitherto unknown pathogen, the bacterium Rhizomonas suberifaciens."

Recent and Current International Activities

2016 Teaching an international course on the epidemiology of bacterial plant diseases in Finland
2015-present Member of the Plant Health Panel of the European Food Safety Authority
2005-present Member of the Scientific Council of Agroinnova, Turino, Italy
2000-present Member of the Jakob Eriksson Prize Fund Commission of the International Society of Plant Pathology

Supervision of Finalized PhD Theses

19 as main advisor and 18 as co-advisor

About

Dr. Ariena H.C. van Bruggen came to the University of Florida in 2009 as a full professor in the Department of Plant Pathology and the Emerging Pathogens Institute. She has a 20% teaching and 80% research appointment. She has carried out research on the epidemiology and spread of emerging plant pathogens and on the relation between ecosystem health and the invasion by plant and human pathogens. She develops simulation and risk models for pathogen spread. At UF, she has coordinated an introductory plant pathology course (once), taught a colloquium series on the use of statistical analysis in plant pathology (once) and taught the graduate course in Plant Disease Epidemiology every other year.

Research

Epidemiology and Microbial Ecology

Prof. Van Bruggen carries out fundamental and applied research on ecosystem health in relation to the invasion by plant and human pathogens. A healthy ecosystem is characterized by a dynamically balanced and diverse community of organisms, stability and resilience after disturbances, minimal losses of nutrients and energy, and sporadic outbreaks of pests and diseases. We hypothesize that the extent of oligotrophy, in terms of easily available carbon sources and mineral nutrients, largely determines the health status of an ecosystem. This concept was developed based on research results on the survival and spread of enteric human pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica) from manure to soil, water and plants. A probabilistic risk model was developed for the contamination of a lettuce crop by manure, soil, and water contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. Internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhmurium in tomato leaves, stems and fruits by was shown to occur from contaminated water and aerosols. Simulation models were developed for the survival of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in manure, manure-amended soil and water. We are currently collaborating on a risk model for the transfer of Salmonella from soil and water to tomato fruits.

Besides research on ecosystem health and transmission routes of enteric pathogens, the integration of various temporal and spatial scales of ecological processes and the dispersal capacity of (re)emerging pathogens in agroecosystems have been recurrent themes in van Bruggen’s research projects. The dynamics of disease progress can be understood better when we take the response time into account for the different developmental stages of the pathogen in relation to the hourly dynamics of environmental conditions rather than average conditions. This was shown for the plant pathogens Bremia lactucae and Phytophthora infestans as well as for the human pathogens E. coli O157:H7 and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. This research has implications for the effects of climate change on pathogen growth. We are currently developing a simulation model for the potential effects of climate change on late blight development.

On the applied side, an audit-based certification system for the greenhouse ornamental industry, including a risk model for pathogen spread, has been developed. In addition, the epidemiology and spread of emerging plant pathogens like Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and Guignardia citricarpa associated with citrus huanglongbing and black spot, respectively, as well as Raffaelea lauricola causing laurel wilt, have been studied and simulation and risk models have been developed for the spread of these pathogens.